Chris Benderev

Chris Benderev is a founding producer of and also reports stories for NPR's documentary-style podcast, Embedded. He's driven into coal mines, watched as a town had to shutter its only public school after 100 years in operation, and, recently, he's followed the survivors of a mass shooting for two years to understand what happens after they fade from the news. He's also investigated the pseudoscience behind a national chain of autism treatment facilities. As a producer, he's made stories about ISIS, voting rights and Donald Trump's business history. Earlier in his career, he was a producer at NPR's Weekend Edition, Morning Edition, Hidden Brain and the TED Radio Hour.

One day after the military stormed the president of Guinea's palace and took him into custody, the coup's leader ordered ministers from the ousted government not to depart the country and to hand over their official vehicles.

In a meeting Monday with the ministers — who had been warned that not attending would be considered an act of rebellion — Col. Mamady Doumbouya also encouraged companies that conduct mining in Guinea to continue their work, exempting them from a nationwide curfew. He also said there would not be a witch-hunt against former officials.

Have you ever noticed that when something important is missing in your life, your brain can only seem to focus on that missing thing?

A rescue boat transporting 60 migrants who were rescued in the waters off Libya is on its way to Barcelona Sunday after Italy and Malta both denied port to the vessel Saturday.

As Italy and Malta squabbled Saturday over why they weren't the appropriate landing spots for the boat — each argued the other was closer to the point of rescue in the Mediterranean Sea — Barcelona's mayor, Ada Colau, stepped in and offered her city.

The Open Arms is not the first migrant vessel operated by a humanitarian group to upset Italy's Salvini in recent months.

What began in downtown Portland, Ore., on Saturday as a permitted march by the far-right group Patriot Prayer was quickly declared a riot and halted by police after altercations with anti-fascist counterprotesters escalated, with reports of projectiles causing several injuries.

Some parents see it coming. Natalie was not that kind of parent.

Even after the director and a teacher at her older son's day care sat her down one afternoon in 2011 to detail the 3-year-old's difficulty socializing and his tendency to chatter endlessly about topics his peers showed no interest in, she still didn't get the message.

Her son, the two educators eventually spelled out, might be on the autism spectrum.

"I was in tears at the end," she says. "When I got home, I was just devastated."

This story is part of a series on coal country by NPR's Embedded podcast. Episode audio is below.

On May 5, 2016, Donald Trump led a campaign rally in Charleston, W.Va.

He put on a hard hat and pretended he was shoveling coal. The crowd loved it.

And he made a promise — a variation on one he had been making throughout the campaign — to coal miners.

Ingvar Kamprad, the man who created IKEA, leaves behind a professional legacy that's all about simplicity: sleek, affordable, Scandinavian-designed furniture with wordless assembly instructions.

His personal legacy, however, is more complicated: from a reputation for strict frugality to flirtations with fascism.

But we'll get to that.

As protesters across Russia rallied Sunday against a presidential election in March they say is rigged in President Vladimir Putin's favor, police in Moscow forcibly detained the opposition leader who sparked the demonstrations, Alexei Navalny, soon after he joined his supporters on the streets of the capital.

Saturday saw protesters take to the streets from New York to Los Angeles — from Nigeria to Iraq. Various incarnations of the second annual Women's March demanded social change, promoted female empowerment and declared a resistance to President Trump on the anniversary of his inauguration.

Turkey on Sunday continued a major attack inside northwestern Syria on a Kurdish militia it has called a "terror army" that presents a danger to Turkish security.

One day earlier Turkey sent tanks and armored vehicles lumbering across the border with Syria to add to artillery and aerial invasions already underway against the YPG, which Ankara seeks to drive out of the Afrin region of Syria.

Turkey also announced Saturday that the aerial component of its "Operation Olive Branch" had struck 108 YPG targets, as NPR's Peter Kenyon tells our newscast unit.

Pages