Ailsa Chang

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To color grade a photo is to alter its hues — to make them brighter, bolder, more or less detailed — in order to create a particular effect. That's what English singer-songwriter Tirzah does with reflections on her life in her sophomore album, Colourgrade.

A lot has happened for Tirzah since her last album, Devotion, in 2018: She quit her job as a textile print designer, had a second child and wrote a whole new album. But going back into the studio? She tells NPR's Ailsa Chang that was old hat:

At the heart of Esperanza Spalding's new album, Songwrights Apothecary Lab (S.A.L.), is a question: "What do you need a song for?" In pursuit of answers, Spalding, a Grammy-winning jazz singer and bassist, assembled a team of more than just other musicians; she created a laboratory of sorts, gathering neuroscientists, psychologists, ethnomusicologists and more. "We are like shipwrights," Spalding says in an interview with NPR's Ailsa Chang. "We build things.

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Nothing has laid bare the importance of high-speed internet more than this pandemic, as so many Americans have been forced to conduct their lives online.

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