Tim Mak

Tim Mak is NPR's Washington Investigative Correspondent, focused on political enterprise journalism.

His reporting interests include the 2020 election campaign, national security and the role of technology in disinformation efforts.

He appears regularly on NPR's Morning Edition, All Things Considered and the NPR Politics Podcast.

Mak was one of NPR's lead reporters on the Mueller investigation and the Trump impeachment process. Before joining NPR, Mak worked as a senior correspondent at The Daily Beast, covering the 2016 presidential elections with an emphasis on national security. He has also worked on the Politico Defense team, the Politico breaking news desk and at the Washington Examiner. He has reported abroad from the Horn of Africa and East Asia.

Mak graduated with a B.A. from McGill University, where he was a valedictorian. He also currently holds a national certification as an Emergency Medical Technician.

Young investors have a new strategy: watching financial disclosures of sitting members of Congress for stock tips.

One way the National Rifle Association projects its power is through the image of tens of thousands of members in a convention center, in front of the politicians who back the powerful gun rights organization.

But this weekend, for the second year in a row, the NRA's chosen convention center will stand empty, after the group was forced to cancel its annual meeting due to the COVID pandemic.

As rioters made their way through the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, many of them livestreamed their actions and posted photos and videos on social media. That steady stream of content created an enormous record of evidence that law enforcement needed to sift through to build cases against the accused.

Now, more than 575 federal criminal complaints have been filed, and a striking pattern has emerged: Time and time again, the FBI is relying on crowdsourced tips from an ad hoc community of amateur investigators sifting through that pile of content for clues.

The health care company One Medical, under government scrutiny for allegedly using vaccine distribution to increase its bottom line, is facing a new challenge from within: employees who accuse the company of placing profits over patients.

Dozens of One Medical employees are trying to unionize as a response to what they say has been mismanagement of the organization's COVID-19 response, poor working conditions for staff and, they allege, a declining focus on patients.

Early one morning in January, Suzanne Ianni peered through her window to discover two black SUVs and a police cruiser parked in front of her house. All she could think was: "Aw, they're here."

While Ianni had been expecting federal agents for days, she wasn't fully prepared for their arrival or for the moment when they said, "You're under arrest." "And I just sat down in a chair, I was trying to catch my breath," she told NPR. "And they're like, OK just relax," she said. "It's only a misdemeanor."

For months, officials have been saying the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol was the result of a classic intelligence failure. Now key officials are questioning whether that was the case.

Updated at 6:43 pm ET

A federal bankruptcy judge dismissed an effort by the National Rifle Association to declare bankruptcy on Tuesday, ruling that the gun rights group had not filed the case in good faith.

The ruling slams the door on the NRA's attempt to use bankruptcy laws to evade New York officials seeking to dissolve the organization. In his decision, the federal judge said that "using this bankruptcy case to address a regulatory enforcement problem" was not a permitted use of bankruptcy.

More than three months after the U.S. Capitol riot, a bomb-maker remains on the loose.

A majority of the public's attention has been focused on the hundreds of people who have been charged for their role on Jan. 6. But the night before, someone committed a different crime: The person placed two explosive devices near the Capitol in Washington, D.C., and that person is still at large.

In the wake of the Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol, a popular narrative has emerged: that because rioters did not fire guns that day, they were not really "armed."

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