Raina Douris

Raina Douris, an award-winning radio personality from Toronto, Ontario, comes to World Cafe from the CBC (Canadian Broadcasting Corporation), where she was host and writer for the daily live, national morning program Mornings on CBC Music. She is also involved with Canada's highest music honors: Since 2017, she has hosted the Polaris Music Prize Gala, for which she is also a jury member, and she has also been a jury member for the Juno Awards. Douris has also served as guest host and interviewer for various CBC Music and CBC Radio programs, and red carpet host and interviewer for the Juno Awards and Canadian Country Music Association Awards, as well as a panelist for such renowned CBC programs as Metro Morning, q and CBC News.

Douris began her career at Toronto rock station 102.1 The Edge, and then continued on to CBC Radio 3, where she hosted daily music-focused shows. In 2013, she was part of the team that launched Central Ontario Broadcasting's Indie88 radio station, and served as its music director and afternoon host before moving to the morning show. In both 2014 and 2015, she was chosen as the "Best Radio Personality in Toronto" by Now Magazine readers for her work. She is a 2009 graduate of Ryerson University's Radio & Television Arts program.

Domino Recording Co Ltd / YouTube

The worst thing you can do when trying to be "cool" is try too hard. You can't get too excited about things.

Garbage is a band that opened my eyes and shifted my perspective. When I first heard their music, I was a 10-year-old kid in a house where classic rock was everything. It was a lot of guys with guitars. My mind was blown by "Queer," from Garbage's 1995 debut album, a track I discovered from a mix CD.

The new Counting Crows album — the band's first in seven years — is not your typical release. As the title suggests, Butter Miracle Suite One is a record more accurately described as a suite.

Shungudzo's life is like a movie, with twists and turns. Born in the United States, the singer spent her early years in Zimbabwe where she became the first Black woman to represent Zimbabwe as a gymnast at the All-Africa Games. She then moved back to attend Stanford University, where she got involved in charity work. She was also featured on a reality show, all the while making music.

When Valerie June enters a room, the air transforms. When she sings, her voice hits like an ocean wave and carries the listener along with it. With power and restraint, she uses her voice to its full effect.

"Punk" can mean a lot of different things – an attitude, a perspective, a music genre. All three, or none? It's this open-ended interpretation that's given the "genre" such a long life – and now, the South London band Goat Girl is defining its own version.

Like a perennial blooming in the spring, we're witnessing a beautiful, new beginning for Michelle Zauner of Japanese Breakfast. Her new album, Jubilee, is a sonic departure from the darker songwriting themes of earlier records.

Buck Meek's solo music is disarming and intimate. If you're familiar with his work as the guitarist for Big Thief, that might not come as a surprise. His music is saturated with peculiar, beautiful imagery — a motel with a telephone seashell, two tons of turtle doves, a cottonmouth swallowing its tail. They're pictures painted with country-tinged vocals, begging to be deciphered.

There has been plenty to discuss since the release of Ma Rainey's Black Bottom last year. It tells the story of August Wilson and other Black Americans in the 20th century who fled the south and headed north. The film was adapted from a play by Wilson, directed by George C.

Pages