Dina Temple-Raston

Microsoft officials say hackers linked to the Russian intelligence service, SVR, appear to have launched another supply chain attack — this time on a company that allowed the intruders to slip into the computer networks of a roster of human rights groups and think tanks.

Microsoft said it discovered the breach this week and believes it began with hackers breaking into an email marketing company called Constant Contact, which provides services to, among others, the United States Agency for International Development.

Updated May 28, 2021 at 12:50 PM ET

The same Russian hackers who carried out the SolarWinds attack and other malicious campaigns have now attacked groups involved in international development, human rights and other issues, according to Microsoft. The company said the breach began with a takeover of an email marketing account used by the U.S. Agency for International Development.

A flawed coronavirus test distributed by government scientists early in the pandemic was poorly designed and came with erroneous instructions that made it doubly difficult for labs to rely on the test's results, new records show. The shortcomings of the test kits cost the nation precious weeks as officials sought to detect virus hot spots and manage the outbreak.

For months, officials have been saying the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol was the result of a classic intelligence failure. Now key officials are questioning whether that was the case.

The Biden administration is putting the final touches on an executive order aimed at helping the U.S. defend itself against sophisticated cyberattacks like the one Russian hackers recently leveled against Texas software-maker SolarWinds.

"This release includes bug fixes, increased stability and performance improvements."

The routine software update may be one of the most familiar and least understood parts of our digital lives. A pop-up window announces its arrival and all that is required of us is to plug everything in before bed. The next morning, rather like the shoemaker and the elves, our software is magically transformed.

More than three months after the U.S. Capitol riot, a bomb-maker remains on the loose.

A majority of the public's attention has been focused on the hundreds of people who have been charged for their role on Jan. 6. But the night before, someone committed a different crime: The person placed two explosive devices near the Capitol in Washington, D.C., and that person is still at large.

Before Jan. 6, the run-ins Bruno Cua, 18, had had with police in his small town of Milton, Ga., were mostly of the scofflaw variety.

He blew an air horn in the school parking lot — that ended with a citation for disturbing the peace. He had been on the receiving end of multiple warnings for trespassing — he insisted on cutting through someone else's land to go fishing. And, according to court documents, his all-terrain vehicle was also a source of consternation: Police kept telling him to stop driving it on roads where it didn't belong.

Before Jan. 6, 18-year-old Bruno Cua was best known in his small town of Milton, Ga., as a great builder of treehouses. These were big, elaborate creations with ladders and trapdoors and framed-out windows. They were so impressive, neighbors paid Cua to build them for their kids.

Updated June 11, 2021 at 4:21 PM ET

Editor's note: This story was first published on Feb. 9, 2021. It is regularly updated, and includes explicit language.

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