Bill Chappell

Bill Chappell is a writer and editor on the News Desk in the heart of NPR's newsroom in Washington, D.C.

Chappell's work for NPR includes being the lead writer for online coverage of several Olympic Games, from London in 2012 and Rio in 2016 to Pyeongchang in 2018 – stints that also included posting numerous videos and photos to NPR's Instagram and other branded accounts. He has also previously been NPR.org's homepage editor.

Chappell established the Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps on NPR's website; his assignments also include being the lead web producer for NPR's trip to Asia's Grand Trunk Road. Chappell has coordinated special digital features for Morning Edition and Fresh Air, in addition to editing the rundown of All Things Considered. He also frequently contributes to other NPR blogs, such as The Salt.

At NPR, Chappell has trained both digital and radio staff to tell compelling stories, promoting more collaboration between departments and desks.

Chappell was a key editorial member of the small team that performed one of NPR's largest website redesigns. One year later, NPR.org won its first Peabody Award, along with the National Press Foundation's Excellence in Online Journalism award.

Prior to joining NPR, Chappell was part of the Assignment Desk at CNN International, working with reporters in areas from the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America. Chappell also edited and produced stories for CNN.com's features division, before moving on to edit video and produce stories for Sports Illustrated's website.

Early in his career, Chappell wrote about movies, restaurants, and music for alternative weeklies, in addition to his first job: editing the police blotter.

The deputy mayor of Airmont, N.Y., has been arrested on multiple weapons charges after police discovered an arsenal of illegal guns in his house — including 16 assault weapons and 13 silencers, according to the district attorney's office. Investigators said they also found a stash of fake federal IDs, including FBI credentials.

Deputy Mayor Brian Downey, 47, now faces more than 30 state and federal criminal counts.

Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis is "completely incorrect" to suggest vaccines are a personal choice with no broad implications, says Dr. Anthony Fauci, the country's top infectious disease authority.

"If [DeSantis] feels that vaccines are not important for people, that they're just important for some people, that's completely incorrect," Fauci said after being asked about DeSantis' views during an interview Tuesday with CNN.

Updated September 7, 2021 at 11:52 AM ET

The Human Rights Campaign has ousted Alphonso David as its president, saying it fired him for cause in the wake of a report that found he helped former New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo respond to sexual misconduct allegations.

David's exit is contentious, with both sides accusing the other of spreading falsehoods.

Hurricane Ida's remnants created deadly havoc in Pennsylvania, New Jersey and New York days after the system hit the Gulf Coast — some 1,000 miles away.

There was "just the right mix of weather conditions" in place to fuel the system, according to Tripti Bhattacharya, an assistant professor of earth and environmental sciences at Syracuse University.

The dating-app company Bumble has created a special fund to help people affected by Texas' new abortion ban. The CEO of Match, which owns Tinder, is creating a similar fund. Both companies are based in Texas and are led by women.

It was only a matter of a few minutes — but the rules are the rules, and organizers say Malaysian shot putter Muhammad Ziyad Zolkefli became ineligible to compete after he arrived late to his event at the Tokyo Paralympics.

Zolkefli was allowed to compete in the event under protest on Tuesday, as Malaysia's delegation sought a way for him to defend the gold medal he won in Rio De Janeiro in 2016. He turned in the longest throw of the competition — in fact, his throw of 17.94 meters (58.85 feet) would have been good enough to win a gold medal and set a new world record.

If the U.S. had done more to reduce its incarceration rate, it could have prevented millions of COVID-19 cases.

That's the conclusion of researchers who conducted what they say is the first study to link mass incarceration rates to pandemic vulnerability. Many of those preventable cases, they add, occurred in communities of color.

A man who disrupted NBC News correspondent Shaquille Brewster's live report on Hurricane Ida is now facing an arrest warrant on criminal charges.

Members of the public helped identify Benjamin Eugene Dagley of Wooster, Ohio, according to police in Gulfport, Mississippi.

Dagley is charged with four criminal counts, including two counts of simple assault, one of disturbing the peace and another of violating an emergency curfew, according to the Gulfport Police Department.

The entire board of Iceland's soccer federation has abruptly resigned after being accused of mishandling allegations of sexual assault committed by players on the national team — and of covering up at least one alleged incident. The board also issued an apology to the victims, saying it believes them and promising to do better.

They helped their country fight for freedom, although they were denied it at home and served in a segregated Army unit. But the Black men of the 369th Infantry Regiment, widely known as the Harlem Hellfighters, fought with valor and skill — and their accomplishment has now been recognized with a Congressional Gold Medal.

Pages