Andrew Flanagan

Mac Davis, a songwriter and performer who began a decades-long ascent in music and entertainment in the early 1960s, died Tuesday in Nashville following heart surgery. His death was confirmed by his manager, Jim Morey. He was 78.

Ronald "Khalis" Bell, a co-founder, songwriter, saxophonist, vocalist and producer of the chart-topping group Kool & The Gang, died Wednesday morning at his home in the U.S. Virgin Islands. He was 68.

Bell's death was confirmed by a Universal Music publicist, though no cause was provided.

While it's still unknown when musicians and touring artists will again be able to perform in venues, those based abroad and hoping to tour the U.S. will face increased costs to do so legally.

At this point, in this year, on this planet, none of us have to search far to find that time has become fungible. In a single released just a month or so ago, "Stuck," Black Grapefruit captured that insecurity and confusion over the future: "Full moon last night / Woke up got high / News say we all dyin' / Guess I better get high again."

Then there's the other, equally powerful aspect of the era: the hope, visible and flitting back and forth just in front of all the turmoil, and the possibilities that could follow. Black Grapefruit thought about that, too.

Malik Abdul-Basit, a rapper best known for his work with The Roots as Malik B., has died. He was 47.

Bandcamp, the online music marketplace used by tens of thousands of independent artists and labels, has once again announced plans to donate its cut of one day's sales to a progressive cause, this time adding an annual commitment. On this and every subsequent Juneteenth — the June 19 holiday commemorating the end of African American slavery — the platform intends to direct its usual revenue share to the NAACP Legal Defense Fund.

A day after the music industry blacked itself out en masse, Warner Music Group, one of the world's three major record labels, announced today that it is back to business in a big way. But not as usual. As of today, the conglomerate will be a publicly traded company.

A lawsuit over the fiery loss of recording materials, spurred on by a New York Times Magazine investigation published last year, has ended. For now.

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