Jasmine Garsd

I was 9 years old and living in Buenos Aires, Argentina, in the summer of 1992 when my mother announced that we were heading downtown to run errands.

It was an opportunity to escape the house, my grandmother's nagging and my little brother's jokes. Also, trips downtown almost always meant ice cream. I remember putting on a pink dress with a pink cloth flower over my chest.

In an hour, we were downtown. We reached the front patio of a bookstore when a thunderous explosion went off just down the block. The power was overwhelming.

"I can't be the first person to notice that Brian Williams and Jon Stewart both seem available in about 6 months," NPR's Scott Simon recently tweeted.

It's hard not to compare the two.

A Chinese company building a canal across Nicaragua has handed over more than 15,000 pre-Columbian relics to the Nicaraguan government. The relics, mostly pieces of pottery and obsidian, date from around 500 B.C. to the 1500s A.D.

The Associated Press reports, "The pieces were collected over six weeks by a team of 29 archaeologists and other specialists along the canal's 173-mile route."

Óscar Arnulfo Romero, the archbishop of San Salvador in El Salvador, was an outspoken voice for justice during the civil war that tore that country apart between 1980 and 1992. In the end, he paid with his life: On March 24, 1980, he was shot while giving mass.

Romero spoke out against the Salvadorean army's brutal repression. In February 1980, he wrote an open letter to President Jimmy Carter, pleading that the U.S. discontinue aid to the regime.

In this world, there are two kinds of people: those who wear cowboy boots, and those who don't. That may be true, but Wyoming Sheriff Stephen Haskell says that when his deputies are on duty, they have to hang up their spurs.

Haskell, the newly elected sheriff of Sublette County, says his decision to ban cowboy boots and hats was to ensure that each member of his staff wears a single, identifiable uniform: black trousers, a tan shirt, black boots and a black baseball cap.

He insists it's not just a fashion decision. Rubber-soled shoes just have better traction.

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

You know, in this world there are two kinds of people - those who wear cowboy boots and those who don't. In Wyoming, Sheriff Stephen Haskell has decided his deputies need to be ones who don't. NPR's Jasmine Garsd has the story.

The name Junípero Serra is well known in California: Schools and streets are named in his honor, and statues of the 18th century Spanish missionary still stand. But Native American activists are far less enamored with the friar, saying Serra was actually an accomplice in the brutal colonization of natives. They object to Pope Francis' recent announcement that he will canonize Serra when he travels to the U.S. this fall.

Shin Dong-hyuk told a powerful story about the misery of life in a North Korean prison camp, becoming the most famous defector from that notoriously reclusive country.

On his return trip from Asia, Pope Francis made strong statements supporting the church's ban on artificial means of birth control. He also said Catholics should practice "responsible parenthood" and don't have to breed "like rabbits."

Speaking with reporters on a flight Monday from the Philippines to Rome, Francis encouraged the use of church-approved contraception.

Starting today, the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children will begin sending out Amber Alerts on Facebook's news feed. The alerts will include a photograph of the missing child and the location where the possible abduction took place.

Facebook has 185 million users in the U.S., and the notices will be tailored to location — so users will receive alerts about missing children in their area.

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