Brian Naylor

NPR News' Brian Naylor is a correspondent on the Washington Desk. In this role, he covers politics and federal agencies.

With more than 30 years of experience at NPR, Naylor has served as National Desk correspondent, White House correspondent, congressional correspondent, foreign correspondent, and newscaster during All Things Considered. He has filled in as host on many NPR programs, including Morning Edition, Weekend Edition, and Talk of the Nation.

During his NPR career, Naylor has covered many major world events, including political conventions, the Olympics, the White House, Congress, and the mid-Atlantic region. Naylor reported from Tokyo in the aftermath of the 2011 earthquake and tsunami, from New Orleans following the BP oil spill, and from West Virginia after the deadly explosion at the Upper Big Branch coal mine.

While covering the U.S. Congress in the mid-1990s, Naylor's reporting contributed to NPR's 1996 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Journalism Award for political reporting.

Before coming to NPR in 1982, Naylor worked at NPR Member Station WOSU in Columbus, Ohio, and at a commercial radio station in Maine.

He earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Maine.

Amid signs that special counsel Robert Mueller will soon complete his investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election, President Trump says that he looks forward to seeing the report and that it should be made public.

Answering questions from reporters on the South Lawn of the White House prior to traveling to Ohio on Wednesday, Trump said of Mueller's report, "Let it come out. Let people see it — that's up to the attorney general."

Updated at 6:15 p.m. ET

The White House says President Trump will nominate Stephen Dickson, a former executive and pilot at Delta Air Lines, to lead the Federal Aviation Administration.

For years, the big tech companies have been given pretty much a free rein by Capitol Hill to act as they chose. What congressional oversight of the industry, there was largely focused on whether there was political bias on various platforms.

But in an abrupt reversal this week, Congress is holding oversight hearings, and lawmakers are proposing new regulations in a crackdown on how big tech companies use and resell their customers' personal information.

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White House communications director Bill Shine is resigning his position, the Trump administration announced Friday.

Shine, a former Fox News executive, will become a senior adviser to President Trump's 2020 re-election campaign, according to a White House statement.

"Bill Shine has done an outstanding job working for me and the Administration," Trump said in the statement. "We will miss him in the White House, but look forward to working together on the 2020 Presidential Campaign, where he will be totally involved. Thank you to Bill and his wonderful family!"

Sen. Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio, announced Thursday that he will not be running for president in 2020.

Brown, who recently conducted a multistate "dignity of work" tour, announced that he decided "the best way for him to continue his fight for workers is by serving Ohio in the U.S. Senate."

Brown was re-elected to the Senate last fall and has been one of the few Democrats to win a statewide race in Ohio in recent years, raising hopes among some in the party that he could carry his home state against President Trump.

Sen. Martha McSally, R-Ariz., said Wednesday that while in the Air Force, she was raped by a superior officer.

The dramatic revelation came as she testified before a Senate Armed Services subcommittee hearing on sexual assault in the military.

"I was preyed upon and raped by a superior officer," McSally told the hearing in her opening statement.

She testified that she blamed herself, adding, "I was ashamed and confused." She said she did not report her assault, saying, "I didn't trust the system at the time."

The House oversight committee is demanding the White House turn over documents and witness interviews that it had previously requested as it probes the security clearance process at the White House.

This comes after the New York Times and Washington Post reported that President Trump ordered a top secret clearance for son-in-law and adviser Jared Kushner, despite the concerns of intelligence officials and then-White House chief of staff John Kelly.

North Carolina prosecutors have announced that Leslie McCrae Dowless, the political operative accused of illegally collecting absentee ballots in that state's 9th Congressional District, has been indicted on charges of obstruction of justice and possessing absentee ballots.

President Trump is nominating Kelly Knight Craft as the new U.S. ambassador to the United Nations. If confirmed by the Senate, Craft, currently U.S. ambassador to Canada, will succeed Nikki Haley, who announced her departure last fall.

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