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The Reverend Al Green has long showed music lovers what it means to be blessed by the presence of a great voice. That is, Green's sporadic relationship with the music world beyond the Full Gospel Tabernacle Church in Memphis, where he's preached most Sundays since 1976, shows us in no uncertain terms that the person doing the blessing is the owner of the golden pipes fans cherish.

Precocity has long been a defining feature in the career of Christian Sands. Growing up around New Haven, Conn., he was a boy wonder on piano; by his early teens he was a protégé of the eminent jazz educator Dr. Billy Taylor.

Metric's Emily Haines rarely sticks with one sound for long, whether she's wallowing in the radiant miserablism of her solo records or revving up effervescent synth-pop floor-fillers on her band's 2015 album Pagans in Vegas. On the new Art of Doubt, Metric takes another welcome hard turn — this time back into spiky, guitar-driven rock and roll.

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In 1964, country musician Roger Miller had a big hit on his hands with “King of the Road.”

But there’s more to him than that.

Dave Matthews is sitting in his tour bus, at a table inlaid with a custom board game.

"If you roll '1,' you just want to move the cow one [space] and not poo, that's your decision," he says. "Although I would always poo."

Black Tambourine, Velocity Girl, Lilys, Lorelei, Stereolab — these are just a few of the artists who released 7-inch singles on Slumberland Records in the late '80s and early '90s. That's a helluva run for any label, but also remarkably prescient, considering the simultaneously softer and stranger indie pop that would follow.

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